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Teotihuacan

Feb 9, 2010


Teotihuacan is one of the most noted archaeological attractions in Mexico. Located in San Juan Teotihuacán municipality in the State of México, this place is an enormous archaeological site in the Basin of Mexico, containing some of the largest pyramidal structures built in the pre-Columbian Americas. Apart from the pyramidal structures, Teotihuacan is also known for its large residential complexes, the Avenue of the Dead, and numerous colorful, well-preserved murals.

The name Teōtīhuacān was given by the Nahuatl-speaking Aztec centuries after the fall of the city. At its zenith in the first half of the 1st millennium CE, Teotihuacan was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. At this time it may have had more than 200,000 inhabitants, placing it among the largest cities of the world in this period. The civilization and cultural complex associated with the site is also referred to as Teotihuacan or Teotihuacano.

Although it is a subject of debate whether Teotihuacan was the center of a state empire, its influence throughout Mesoamerica is well documented; evidence of Teotihuacano presence, if not outright political and economic control, can be seen at numerous sites in Veracruz and the Maya region. The ethnicity of the inhabitants of Teotihuacan is also a subject of debate. Possible candidates are the Nahua, Otomi or Totonac ethnic groups. Scholars have also suggested that Teotihuacan was a multiethnic state.

As a city, Teotihuacan has a multi-ethnic city, with distinct quarters occupied by Otomi, Zapotec, Mixtec, Maya and Nahua peoples. The religion of Teotihuacan was similar to those of other Mesoamerican cultures. Many of the same gods were worshiped, including the Feathered Serpent (the Aztecs' Quetzalcoatl) and Rain God (the Aztecs' Tlaloc.)The dominant civic architecture is the pyramid. Politics were based on the state religion; religious leaders were the political leaders.
Site Layout is consisting of many parts. The city's broad central avenue, called "Avenue of the Dead" (a translation from its Nahuatl name Miccoatli), is flanked by impressive ceremonial architecture, including the immense Pyramid of the Sun (second largest in the New World after the Great Pyramid of Cholula) and the Pyramid of the Moon

Further down the Avenue of the Dead is the area known as the Citadel, containing the ruined Temple of the Feathered Serpent. This area was a large plaza surrounded by temples that formed the religious and political center of the city.

Now, the site was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987 and became one of. Tourist destination in Mexico, especially for archaeological sites.

2 comments:

Sang Cerpenis bercerita said...

bagus bangeet. ke sana yuk, nchi

February 17, 2010 at 1:51 PM
-Gek- said...

jadi ingat Zuma... :)

February 17, 2010 at 2:35 PM

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